For Parents

Bridging the person in need to the Resources Available.
If you have a resource and would like us to post it, please email caingelconnection@gmail.com
HELPLINES

Aspen Hope Center 24-hour Hope line/Crisis Line

Garfield County: 1-970-945-3728
Aspen: 1-970-925-5858.

Colorado Crisis Services (CCS)
Call 1-844-493-8255
Text “TALK” to 38255.

SAMHSA National Helpline
For mental or substance use disorders:
Call 1-800-662-HELP (4357)
TTY: 1-800-487-4889
Text your zip code to 435748
Chat online https://988lifeline.org

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Call 1-800-273-8255 (TALK).

Depression and Mental Illness
The relationship between depression and mental illness and substance abuse is bi-directional; people who are depressed or suffering from mental illness are more likely to abuse substances and substance abusers are more likely to suffer from depression and other mental illnesses.
DEPRESSION RESOURCES

Signs of depression in teens

Feelings of sadness & worthlessness

Frequent thoughts of death, dying, and suicide

Withdrawing from family and friends

Other signs are not as noticeable such as:

Irritability

Changes in eating and sleeping habits

Fatigue or lethargy

Inability to focus or concentrate

Stomach problems or headaches

Poor hygiene

Acting out behaviors.

What you can do as a parent

As a parent your role is challenging. The most important thing a parent can do is listen to understand (not respond) and then validate your child’s feelings and try to work on understanding. Some wording examples for parents “Tell me more about that and help me understand what you are thinking and feeling”. Your child needs you, even if they push back, just respond with kindness, love, and patience.

https://www.safeandsober.org/resources/parents-guide-depression-teenagers/

Talking to children about mental illness can be an opportunity for parents and caregivers to provide their children with information and also an opportunity to connect more in depth with your child.

ParentCaregiverTraining@samhsa.hhs.gov email for questions or comments.

Options for help

For mental or substance use disorders:

Call SAMHSA’s National Helpline:

1-800-662-HELP (4357) or TTY: 1-800-487-4889, or text your zip code to 435748.

For help searching for substance use and mental health facilities (health care centers, buprenorphine practitioners, and opioid treatment providers): FindTreatment.gov.

For help with suicidal thoughts or behaviors:

Talk to someone you can trust through the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline.

Call or text 988 or chat the Lifeline.

More resources:

SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)

https://www.samhsa.gov/families/parent-caregiver-resources

ADDICTION RESOURCES
Recommendations

Parents can open conversation with kids on topics of drugs, alcohol, and tobacco early on.

Take advantage of teachable moments through TV, Movies, Internet, or examples of life situations. Keep your tone calm and non-judgmental. You would be surprised on how open your child may be on these topics.

Encourage your child to be involved in clubs, sports, hobbies, or interests.

Pay attention as there are signs you may easily overlook. Check in frequently with your child, know who they are hanging with, know their parents, don’t be afraid to ask questions, and don’t be afraid to have eyes on cell phones, emails, websites, texts, and encourage in person fun friend and family time with your kids!

Depression and Mental Illness
The relationship between depression and mental illness and substance abuse is bi-directional; people who are depressed or suffering from mental illness are more likely to abuse substances and substance abusers are more likely to suffer from depression and other mental illnesses.
DEPRESSION RESOURCES

Signs of depression in teens

Feelings of sadness & worthlessness

Frequent thoughts of death, dying, and suicide

Withdrawing from family and friends

Other signs are not as noticeable such as:

Irritability

Changes in eating and sleeping habits

Fatigue or lethargy

Inability to focus or concentrate

Stomach problems or headaches

Poor hygiene

Acting out behaviors.

What you can do as a parent

As a parent your role is challenging. The most important thing a parent can do is listen to understand (not respond) and then validate your child’s feelings and try to work on understanding. Some wording examples for parents “Tell me more about that and help me understand what you are thinking and feeling”. Your child needs you, even if they push back, just respond with kindness, love, and patience.

https://www.safeandsober.org/resources/parents-guide-depression-teenagers/

Talking to children about mental illness can be an opportunity for parents and caregivers to provide their children with information and also an opportunity to connect more in depth with your child.

ParentCaregiverTraining@samhsa.hhs.gov email for questions or comments.

Options for help

For mental or substance use disorders:

Call SAMHSA’s National Helpline:

1-800-662-HELP (4357) or TTY: 1-800-487-4889, or text your zip code to 435748.

For help searching for substance use and mental health facilities (health care centers, buprenorphine practitioners, and opioid treatment providers): FindTreatment.gov.

For help with suicidal thoughts or behaviors:

Talk to someone you can trust through the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline.

Call or text 988 or chat the Lifeline.

More resources:

SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)

https://www.samhsa.gov/families/parent-caregiver-resources

ADDICTION RESOURCES
Recommendations

Parents can open conversation with kids on topics of drugs, alcohol, and tobacco early on.

Take advantage of teachable moments through TV, Movies, Internet, or examples of life situations. Keep your tone calm and non-judgmental. You would be surprised on how open your child may be on these topics.

Encourage your child to be involved in clubs, sports, hobbies, or interests.

Pay attention as there are signs you may easily overlook. Check in frequently with your child, know who they are hanging with, know their parents, don’t be afraid to ask questions, and don’t be afraid to have eyes on cell phones, emails, websites, texts, and encourage in person fun friend and family time with your kids!

Get in Touch. Get Involved.

We would love to stay in touch with you!

Also, if there’s something you are looking for that you couldn’t find here please let us know.

contact@cainegelconnection.org

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